Services

No-Scalpel Vasectomy in Voorhees & Washington Township, NJ

A typical vasectomy procedure requires that two small incisions be made on the patient’s scrotum in order to access the vas deferens. Dr. Thomas Mueller utilizes an even less invasive procedure that is often referred to as a no-scalpel vasectomy, or a keyhole vasectomy.

Dr. Mueller performs hundreds of vasectomies each year at his urology clinics in Voorhees and Washington Township and has been practicing urology for nearly 20 years. He is board-certified by the American Board of Urology and is a member of the International Society for Sexual Medicine. If you’re considering a vasectomy, contact us today to schedule an appointment. Give our office a call at (877) 388-2778 or request an appointment through our secure online form. We have locations in Voorhees and Washington Township.

How Does It Work?

Rather than making a sizable incision on the scrotum, the no-scalpel vasectomy is performed entirely through a puncture made in the scrotal sac. This hole is so small that stitches are rarely ever required after the procedure is complete. Topical anesthetic is applied to ensure that no pain is felt during the vasectomy.

The process is much the same as a standard vasectomy with the ultimate goal being to prevent the patient from having children in the future. To achieve sterilization, the vas deferens must be severed. These two tubes are responsible for transporting a man’s sperm to his semen, which is stored in the testes. By cutting the vas deferens, it becomes impossible for this sperm to travel outside of the body and potentially fertilize a woman’s eggs.

During a keyhole vasectomy, each of these tubes are gently manipulated until they protrude through the puncture site. Once Dr. Mueller has a clear visual of the area, the vas deferens are cut and blocked permanently.

Benefits of a No-Scalpel Vasectomy

Any type of vasectomy presents a number of advantages to each potential patient. Men who are looking to avoid future children in a way that is safe, effective, and affordable are often considered primary candidates for this kind of procedure.

Aside from the regular benefits of a vasectomy, the no-scalpel procedure also allows for:

  • Shorter recovery time
  • Reduced risk of complications such as infection or bleeding
  • The ability to resume sexual activities much sooner
  • No scarring
  • The ability to perform the procedure from one of our convenient urology clinic locations

Patients should expect a mild amount of discomfort following their no-scalpel vasectomy. This pain should begin to gradually decrease almost immediately, though a majority of our patients report feeling little to no pain at all.

We recommend that patients rest for at least one or two days post-procedure. Shortly after this period you should be able to return to regular activities. If you are unsure about whether or not it is safe to engage in any routine task, please consult with your physician.

Vasectomy Consultation with Urologist Thomas J Mueller, MD

If you would like additional information about the no-scalpel vasectomy procedure, or would like to see if you are a candidate, please contact us today at (877) 388-2778 to schedule an appointment with Dr. Mueller. You may also request an appointment online using our secure form. Our urology offices are in Washington Township and Voorhees.

Frequently Asked Questions

How Long Will I Need to Recover?

Recovery from a vasectomy, especially one that is performed using minimally invasive techniques, is quite minimal. Patients should expect some soreness and swelling in the first 24-48 hours after their vasectomy, though this should dissipate quickly so long as they rest and limit their activities as much as possible during this period.

Most men are able to return to work and other everyday responsibilities within 2-3 days following their vasectomy, though it is advised to avoid any heavy lifting or other strenuous activity until you receive proper clearance from Dr. Mueller.

Are There Major Risks to Having a Vasectomy?

The most common side effects after a vasectomy are mild pain, bruising, bleeding, and swelling. Of course, it is still possible for more severe issues to occur, though they are incredibly rare. These include:

  • Infection
  • Chronic pain
  • Failure to prevent pregnancy
  • Granuloma (inflammation caused by leaking sperm)
  • Spermatocele formation (a small cyst of the upper testicle region)
  • Hydrocele (a fluid-filled sac of tissue that grows within the scrotum)

Individuals at risk for more serious complications include those who have suffered testicular cancer or testicular disease, though even in these outlying groups rarely encounter serious side effects caused by a vasectomy. Be sure to discuss your own individual risk factors with Dr. Mueller to determine if a vasectomy is a safe option for you.

Will a Vasectomy Affect My Sexual Function?

No. A vasectomy has absolutely no proven effect on a man’s sex drive, sexual functions, or pleasure during sex. There are many common myths surrounding this particular question, though all evidence clearly shows that the only difference a man should notice after a vasectomy compared to his life before is that he is no longer able to father children.

How Effective Is a Vasectomy?

Please be very aware that the results of a vasectomy are not immediate. Dr. Mueller will need to test the patient’s sperm in the weeks following a vasectomy to determine if the procedure was in fact successful at preventing the production and transfer of sperm through the vas deferens. During this time, men are instructed not to engage in unprotected sex, as this could lead to a potential pregnancy.

A vasectomy is more than 99% effective. Of the few cases in which a pregnancy does occur after a vasectomy, a majority are within the first year after the procedure is performed.

What If I Change My Mind?

There is a procedure for that as well! A vasectomy reversal may be offered to men who have previously undergone a vasectomy and later wish to conceive a child.

It is of course advised for patients to carefully consider this possibility before they complete a vasectomy, as vasectomy reversal procedures are not guaranteed to be effective. Men may also consider storing their sperm in a sperm bank prior to a vasectomy as a sort of safeguard to this potential situation.